Tag Archives: Offshore

My Noxor-Androx experiment

I’ve lost a lot of weight since I started boxing back around April of this year.  Back then I weighed around 84 to 86 kg (around 185 lbs) and now, depending on how dehydrated my body is, I weigh 71 to 74 kg (around 156 lbs).

Nothing much in my wardrobe fits me right now including my winter jackets which is a problem because I’m pretty lazy when it comes to clothes shopping and it’s getting cold in Scotland. Working offshore doesn’t help either as the standard issue Brit offshore worker lives in a t-shirt and cargo shorts!

So right now my body looks like this:

I’m not quite in the Gerard Butler “300” or the Brad Pitt “Fight Club” range.

Now I’ve never really used supplements before and the key word being supplements not steroids! However an ESPN article I came across, caught my eye.  The article was on two supplements used together (a process called stacking) in order to promote lean muscle mass.  They are Noxor and Androx.  Pretty ridiculous names I know.  They sound like a Las Vegas male stripper act.

Androx comes in a little tube of 60 pills and Noxor comes as 90 pills.

Androx is a testosterone booster with the instructions to take 1-2 capsules a day with your meal.

Noxor contains various things that make you want to re-take high school Chemistry with the recommended use of taking 2-3 capsules 30-60 minutes before workout.

My intention was to trial these on my last offshore trip but they sadly arrived the day after I left for my work in Malaysia.  When I work offshore, I train everyday free from any kind of distraction whereas at home (which is where I am as I write this) I basically cut down to:

  1.  Monday: An hour long game of 5-aside football (soccer).
  2. Tuesday and Thursday: Boxing training sessions lasting 90 minutes.
  3. Two randomly chosen days where I do a 3km run with 25 minutes of shadowboxing afterwards.

The stuff at home and the offshore training since April has got me where I am right now in physical terms and I’m okay with that.  However there’s a part of me that’s interested if these supplements can make any difference.  They’re not exactly cheap either.  Noxor and Androx are sold together for 88 GBP which is 110 USD.  It’s not exactly Weight-Watchers or the Cambridge Diet but I guess it’s not too far from that principal!

I’m going to basically trial these two supplements to see if they actually do anything to my physique.  I’ll start taking them while I’m at home but only before I do any kind of training.

  • I’m not going to change my eating patterns or the types of food I eat.
  • I’m not going to do any additional fasting.

That’s important.  I’m just an ordinary guy training and eating with this one additional change to my routines.

My next offshore trip starts on the 14th December so there’s some crossover.  I’ll find out if this is 88 GBP worth of placebo or if there’s actually some benefit to this.

Training in the Malaysian heat

I can see why some people prefer to do their training (and their living) somewhere warm!  You’d be forgiven for thinking I’ve been physically inactive for the last four weeks but I’ve been training everyday in the Malaysian heat.   Before I left home, I downloaded a whole bunch of YouTube clips of Vasyl Lomachenko practicing his shadowboxing and some of his movements on the heavy bag so I’ve spent the last four weeks putting my study into practice.  I’ve really enjoyed it and there isn’t a day where I’m thankful that I’ve found something I really enjoy that takes my mind and my body away from here.

I’ve lost some more weight but it’s not hard when you’re training in this kind of 26 to 30 degree Celcius heat (79 – 86F).  I’ll have to weigh myself when the boat is moored alongside later this week but the last time I checked I was hovering around 71 kg with my body dehydrated.  I had a moment where I was thinking where all this training is going…  Maybe there shouldn’t be a point.   Maybe I should just enjoy it for however long my body can keep up.   I’m moving a lot better though and I’ve put a lot of time into the training since April.  That’s what life offshore is like.  You can set yourself up so you don’t do anything except work and train everyday and I have.

I managed to get hold of the Pacquiao – Vargas fight.  It was great to see a 37-year old Pacquiao out-score and out-box a man ten years his junior and win back his title.  I’m not saying I’m anything like Pacquiao but if you look after yourself and train hard, you can still accomplish things.

Mind you, I think a younger Pacquiao wouldn’t have let the fight go to twelve rounds but he looked happy in that ring.  He’s always got a smile on his face when he walks on and why wouldn’t he?  Pacquiao was homeless on the streets of Manilla and eventually got paid handsomely doing something he clearly loves and does so well.

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This is one of places I train on this boat.  It’s outdoors but I’m thankful there’s shelter from the sun.  It can get really warm!  I normally shadowbox on the helideck in the sun for 25 minutes before I spend another half an hour on this heavy bag.  There’s not enough space to move 360-degrees around but I can still pivot 180 degrees  in the way I’ve seen Lomachenko practice that move so many times.  One day I might even be able to execute that against someone rather than practice it on the bag.  I’ll do other things additionally like do interval training and run on the treadmill a few times a week so my body’s still getting a good balance.

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This is my cabin.  Small!  I’ve actually made it pretty cosy.  That’s a rug I bought when I was in Indonesia a couple of years ago and I just keep it on the boat.  I think I’ll bring a poster, or two, back with me since I’ll be working over Christmas this year.  It’d be good to have something nice on those bare walls.  I like how my cabin’s become a sanctuary for me.  I can just close that door and I feel relaxed.  I think it’s the rug that ties the room together!  You can see my yellow boxing shoes on that transport box next to an older Mark I PS3.  What have I been playing on that?  Fight Night 4 of course! lol.  I am going to buy Fight Night Champion when I go home.  Give me something to do when I come back for Christmas (Besides more training!).  Right now I’m just looking forward to going home.

 

Flight of the Intruders – A tale in grossness

OK … excluding blood and guts this could be one of the grossest travel stories told involving a man and his boxing gear.

So 5 weeks ago I’m travelling from home, on the way to the boat.  I’ve got my laptop in a rucksack and I’ve got my boxing gear in another carry-on bag.  Sure I could have put that in my check-in bag but sometimes, the check in bag doesn’t make it (especially given I had like 3 connections to make).  Put it this way, there’s no way I’m going to risk being offshore for 5 weeks without being able to box.

I’m on these flights and every now and again, I catch a whiff of my bag and it smells a little stale.  Not really bad but I’m thinking “Crap, have I not washed the bag for a while?  All the clothes inside are clean.”  Maybe I should have washed them at 60 degrees-C and not 40 but I’m thinking “No I’ve never had to wash sports gear at 60”.

Anyway no big deal.

So an overnight stay in a hotel (Never bothered to open the sports bag) and next day I arrive on the boat.  I get my gear into my cabin and start to unpack.  Then I remember about my sports bag and I think to myself “OK what is this strange stale smell in my bag?”

I open it up and the smell is instantly stronger.  I take out a few items and then what do I see?  Yeah what do I see…

There’s a dead mouse in my sports bag – right at the bottom with about fifty maggots crawling all over it.  F*ck I nearly gagged,  I got my stuff out pronto and ran off the vessel, down the gangway plank and just tipped the dead mouse and maggots into the sea.  I gave the bag an almighty shake and made sure every one of those little f**kers got tipped over the side.

How my bag made it through the airport X-rays with parasites and a dead rodent I’ll never know.  I mean, I flew through Amsterdam and Norway and not one word.  Thank God too, I’d have died of embarrassment.  I washed my gym bag at 90-degrees after that (something I’ve never done – 60-degrees is always more than enough!) but the worse thing was that one side of my face guard smelled of dead, rotting mouse.  I wiped it several times with an alcohol-based cleaner and it still smelled.  In fact, it was only in the third week that the smell eventually went away.  I was lucky I packed my boxing gloves into their original air-tight bag otherwise they would have smelled too.

How I missed that mouse when I was packing the bag I just don’t know.  It must have been at the early stage where it was still a fresh kill and hadn’t started to rot yet.  The problem is I leave my bag in my garage, occasionally and I reckon one of my cats maybe chased the thing and it hid in my bag and basically died in there.

It was horrible though.  I kid you not.  That really freaked me out for the rest of the day.  I’ve also semi lost my confidence in airport security.  How a man can carry a dead rodent and live parasites across multiple countries in their hand luggage is pretty concerning!

Wrapping my hands

10 rounds and some fear factor

I’d already had an hour’s session in the morning when Jim poked his head into the instrument room in the afternoon and asked if I fancied doing some sparring.  That morning consisted of a 4km run and around half an hour of drills on the heavy and double end bag.  I was going to do another session in the evening but I didn’t expect to take my body into battle in the evening.

I had a little more trepidation this time.  Maybe because I knew my body had only just recovered from the 12 rounds on Sunday but I wanted to warm up this time.  Jim has his own 12oz gloves and I tried dropping a hint to him as he was wrapping up his hands mentioning there were some unworn 16oz gloves in the gym but he didn’t bite.  I have my pair of 16oz gloves which I always use but I also have a pair of 12oz I took with me, this time.  I haven’t used those yet, this trip.  Jim has only 12oz and it’s a slight advantage.  I didn’t do too badly last 12 rounds so I didn’t mind doing the same again.

One punch of his came and somehow slipped through a gap in my head guard and partially onto my right eye.  It rocked me back and I had to stop momentarily and shake that off.  I wondered if I was going to have a black eye but I had to put that to the back of my mind.  That was only Round 2.

I’ve been boxing for just shy of 6 months now and to be honest, the time and practice that I’ve put in equates more than what an average person would do.  But if you talk ring-craft, I only hold around 24 rounds of experience.  It shows.  I still have tendencies to turn away, my feet are not always balanced, I’m leaning forward or back a little too much.  There are a few hooks that come my way that I don’t even see coming and although a head guard can block off some peripheral vision, that’s lazy eyes on my part.  It tells me I’m not reading body language or aware enough yet.

Jim had gone for a run right before the sparring as well and I know he felt tired too.  It was near Round 7 we decided just to take it to 10 rounds only (and not 12) but even then I was flagging a little.  The first 12 rounds I practiced in that first week, my footwork was way better – I circled around much more and I was much more active.  This session, by the time I reached the 8th, all I wanted to do was Philly-shell up and keep Jim at bay but you can’t do that.  Even though you’re too tired to throw, you have to look like you want to throw otherwise you’re only inviting the other guy onto you.

I managed to survive the 10 rounds but I have a raft of questions that were in my head, that are still in my head today.  They’re all about how I can improve my balance so I am always in a position to throw punches.  Like someone commented… Boxing is about balance.  Keeping yours and taking it away from the other guy.

The two blows to my right pectoral that stopped me dead in my tracks during the sparring made it painful for me to sit up in my bed last night and this morning but it’s minimal stuff.  I’m going to give myself a week from Sunday before the next sparring.  I’m also going to put on my 12 oz gloves next time if Jim continues to wear his.  That will make it even.  My hand speed will be faster.  Faster to come back and protect my head, faster to jab out and ward him off.

Last night was good but I felt trepidation and I didn’t have that the first session.  Maybe because I knew this time I wasn’t 100% and maybe I knew Jim was faster than me which got into my head a little bit.  The bag work, the running, the jumping rope, the drills… that’s where you go to get the techniques.  Sparring?  That’s where you go to learn to fight.  You come to understand what works in the ring for you and what doesn’t work, what you’re doing good and what you’ve got to improve on.  It can’t be about you and someone else inflicting pain on each other – that’s pointless.  If I match up in glove weight with my opponent that will help me answer some more questions, I’m certain of that.  I won’t make that mistake again next session.  I’m getting hit more than Jim, that’s what I feel at least.  That’s not just down to the weight difference in gloves, of course not.  They call boxing The Sweet Science and in science experiments you need certain variables to remain constant in order to solve the other unknowns.

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Powers of recuperation

I remember reading this interview that Arnold Schwarzeneggar did while on the set of Terminator 3 way back when he was making a comeback as an action star (he must have been in his early sixties) and something he said stayed with me.  It was, “Look, I feel great.  I can do everythng I did when I was thirty years old… it just takes me longer to recover from it.”

Arnie nailed that last part in a nutshell.

Those 12 rounds that I sparred, you don’t realize it until after but parts of my body feel like they’ve been tenderized by a meat mallet.  I blocked off a large portion of shots and obviously Jim and me weren’t going at it hammer and tongs style but occassionally, some blows sneak through and the punches absorbed by the defense of your arms and shoulders… you can feel those the day after.

When I mentioned to Jim I was still aching yesterday I was thankful he said the same.  I think it would have demoralized me if he turned and looked puzzled at me and said “No, I feel great.”

The sparring was Sunday and this is Wednesday.  I took Tuesday-night training off and my body felt better this morning for it.  I think I may have been caught under my right arm, somewhere close to my armpit).  It’s tender when I throw an uppercut.  I just gave away my Ibuprofen to a guy who woke up with a cranky neck but I may ask for a couple of tablets back!

I’ve just been eating vegetables and rice this whole week.  I’m not a vegetarian so I’ll happily spoon the sauce from the cook’s chicken curry (for example) with my vegetables!  I can’t quite bring myself to give up desert though!  Saturday I’m going to let myself eat a steak.  Just the steak though.  Rare, bloody.  I can’t wait!  (To hell with it – I need some protein, right? I didn’t bring any Vega with me this time)

We were going to do another sparring session this Sunday which I’m really looking forward to but then Jim just walked into the instrument room just now (now being Thursday) and asked if I was alright for tonight.   I thought about it for a split second before I said yes.  I read a lot of comments on people who sparred for the first time.  There’s a handful that had an awful first-time experience being paired up inappriopriately or having a masochistic coach that insisted on the beginner “toughing it out” as a kind of ritual rather than something useful and progressive.  That’s such a waste.  How many good people who could have really enjoyed and become decent boxers were lost because of someone like that, teaching them?  I can only hope they found another club eventually and felt a little better about themselves instead of being made to feel useless.

When the buzzer goes on my iPod app and we touch gloves the adrenalin is already there.  Sometimes with things like this there’s a fight or flight response that kicks in.  Every animal has it.  If someone spits in your face in the middle of the street society tells you that it’s inaproproate and unlawful to to retaliate and those things are in the back of your head (for many decent civilians out there).  Most people aren’t cowardly – they’re only concerned about the repercusions – that’s what civilisation does to you.  But in a ring, you’re training.  The conditions are fair.  If you can hit me then I can certainly hit you back.  You’re free.  Truly free of any burden.   Some people go through life and don’t get the chance to experience what that’s like.

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Going 12 rounds

I’m back on the boat and training a couple of times a day, again.  That’s the good thing about working offshore – you get a lot of time to contemplate and focus on things.  I decided yesterday to make a legitimate effort to get down to welterweight which is 69 kg, 155 lbs (At the moment I weigh 74 kg, 163 lbs) – I’m on a diet of only rice, vegtables and fish.  I said my last goodbye to Steak Saturdays and I bypassed (what Rich described as) one of the best offshore lasagnes I’ve seen.  I’m not giving up waffles on a Sunday and Wednesday though.  Screw that – I want to box, not be a saint!

I’ll try at least! I don’t want to end up looking like Christian Bale in “The Machinist” and if I start to feel weak when I train then I’ll know I’m maybe not supposed to hovering around that weight.  I’ve not got a weight disorder or anything like that – it’s just that everyone has a weight, at a given age, where their body is in its best condition: Minimal fat, lean muscle, a heart like a whale.  Just this once, I’d like to go for that – before the Good Lord starts to take it away from me little by little. 🙂

Yesterday was a real treat.  I’m onboard a boat and Jim is here too – this time we’ve both got our head gear with us and Jim’s around my weight and height so yesterday evening, after shift we did twelve , three-minute minute rounds of sparring.  I was pleasantly surprised I made it through to the last round.  I was dropped around the eighth or ninth round though.  One of Jim’s punches caught me right on the solar plexus.  I’ve never been hit there before.  You don’t feel anything for a split second (apart from hearing a nice meaty “smack”)  Then it feels like something is going to come out from your mouth.  I dropped down to one knee and spat out my gum shield unsure if I was going to throw up.  I tried to give myself a count and was up and around not long after 10 seconds maybe.  I got caught a few times during those twelve rounds.  One right hook in particular, caught me flush on the ear and I swear I could hear ringing for the next five seconds.

It’s tiring to put yourself within range of a person’s fists and then punch, block and then move out quickly.  You’re having to do that constantly.

That may not sound fun but you feel really alive facing someone.  Not all sports can give you that kind of a buzz.  Probably because the person opposite you is aiming to punch you!  Maybe I’m trying to defend boxing as a sport here… there’s no question there’s an element of violence but it’s built on a foundation of fairness and respect first.  Perhaps that seperates it from other forms like mixed martial arts.  That’s not to say that there isn’t respect in that sport, of course there is but combat sports like MMA are purely about fighting, where anything goes.

I like sparring.  You get to see first hand where all your training is going and what you still have to work on.  I don’t think it would be healthy to spar twelve rounds more than once a week though.  You don’t want to end up getting “punchy”.  I had a shower afterwards and went to bed happy, I really did.  I was up this morning shadowboxing, trying to work more on my movement.  It’s like that when you enjoy something.

Wrapping my hands

 

White collar boxing

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day…

Now whoever said that probably didn’t mean for me to eat double the intake to try and guarantee I had a grandiose style day.

I’m in the Scandic Solsiden in Trondheim Norway after a 5 week trip offshore so if you can’t take a few liberties here and there… well then… I don’t think life’s worth living

There’s a cost-reducing initiative at my company so getting off the boat and checking into the hotel – I had to double up with Bryan just for the night.  There was a moment of panic when we walked into the room and saw this:

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We just laughed at that point but I think we were both glad when we realized the beds could be pulled apart.

I’ve been working nights and the boxing’s taken its toll so as soon as I showered and sat in bed, I pretty much blacked out.

When I woke up I just lay in bed… window wide open, fresh air blowing in – plugged in my headphones and listened to some music… I thought about my wife, my dog, the boxing… just being home again – had a big smile on my face.  I went down for an early breakfast and just left Bryan sleeping with the room to himself.  Gotta give a guy his privacy.

Talk more about the white collar boxing!…

[…sorry yeah I was just getting onto that!…]

I’ve been reading other people’s blogs and I found a few good ones to follow including John Grimshaw, a guy training for an amateur charity boxing bout in 5 weeks.  It’s under the UK company Stealth UK Boxing.  StealthUK do these white collar boxing events where amateurs and beginners train for X-weeks and then they get to fight someone of equal ability.  They get the full arena-style experience and all the tickets that get sold, go to charity.  Sounds pretty awesome I have to say and I’m more than envious.  He’s got 8 weeks to lick himself into shape and he (and his wife) have my heartfelt admiration.  Training that intensely can take you away from the things and people you love and it’s never easy on your ties.  So if you’re reading this John, here’s to you, Mrs Grimshaw and baby Grimshaw.

There’s nothing like a deadline to keep you focussed either.

I’ve been boxing since April which puts me around 8 weeks but one day when my trainer Gary thinks I’m ready, I may look for something like this.  John’s bout is in Middleton, Manchester which is a little out of my way (me living in Scotland) but I’m not ruling out any part of the UK.  That’s the whole Musha shugyō thing again.

It’s not just about boxing or even health and fitness 🙂 … whatever you’re training in or whatever goal you want for yourself keep going for it and when you’re tired and strung out… just try to remember why you began in the first place.

As for me… well right now, I’m just looking forward to returning home.  I’m going to take a couple of days off this week and then I’m going to start training again.  Nothing too strenuous.  4-5 km runs and a bit of bag work.  That will shave my weight back down to 73 to 74 kg and in the second week, I’ll be back inside Lusby’s gym.  Back with Gary, back to my training and back to business.

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There are all kinds of people in the blogosphere and the rest of the world – with their own goals, heartache and personal motivations. I’ll try and say a prayer for all of you.  Love you all. – Southpaw Swan


Musha shugyō (武者修行?) is a samurai warrior’s quest or pilgrimage. The concept is similar to the Chinese Youxia, or Knight Errantry in feudal Europe. A warrior, called a shugyōsha, would wander the land practicing and honing his skills without the protection of his family or school.

Last of the offshore sessions

The end is definitely within sight now.  I thought I was going home on Sunday but those plans changed so the big vessel exodus is still Monday.

I was going to take my morning off training today  and watch the Wales v Belgium football game but I was so tired I slept in until 23:30.  I think it’s just coming to the end of the trip and my body has completely worn down.  I was happy for Wales though as they won 3-1.  I missed a good game apparently.  Typical!

I’ll probably go for a session after shift and then I’ll go for a final one tomorrow when I wake up and that will be the end of the offshore sessions.

I’m getting some weird pains in my left arm when I try and throw a left hook which is really strange.  I’m not sure where that’s come from in the last few days but it feels like the pain vibrates right up my arm to my bicep.  It’s quite a sharp pain.  Almost makes me freeze.

It’s been good though.  Training-wise it’s been great.  Boxing offshore’s really given me something to look forward to every single day. The boxing gear I ordered for the ship arrived as well.  To be honest I try and stay away from the welfare committee nowadays as I feel it’s becoming more of a thankless task.

The welfare commitee is basically a group of people on the vessel who discuss what to do with the welfare money in order to improve the living of the rest of the crew.  Like getting gym equipment, buying a new TV for the day room, organizing a day trip out to a theme park – that’s all classed as “welfare”.

The aim is to try and do some good but then someone starts to complain yet you find yourself roped into doing it again because (a) You’re one of the few that can be bothered and (b) you’re that guy.

It can get to the stage where your crew have fallen out with the other crew over something and the welfare money gets split into two.  You end up in a situation where “You do what you want with it and we do what we want with it.”  That kind of thing.  That’s a rare case but it’s just an example.

I have to visit Lusby’s boxing gym when I get home and Gary can see if I’ve made any progress.  My arms definitely have better  stamina now and it feels like I can punch a little faster.  Note I said faster not harder.

My Adidas boxing boots are stained with dirt, a few salt water marks and the grip on the sole’s worn down a little as well for good measure.

I went and bought a pair of Winning Pro gloves from ebay which I’m seriously excited about.  They’re almost like the Holy Grail of boxing training gloves and a pair of flourescent yellow Nike Hyper KOs.  The Adidas boots I’ll take offshore with me to train and the Nike ones I’ll keep at home.

Nike Hyper KO16oz Winning Training gloves

 

I’m a bit wary of buying nice gear though.  Let’s face it, you don’t want to buy great gear when you’re absolutely crap at something – you just end up looking stupid.  I just love that colour and design of boot though and as for the boxing gloves, I’ve heard that there’s no fit and protection like Winning.  Let’s face it, out here I was spending between 2 to 3 hours a day training so protecting my hands is really important.

More than anything though I miss Emma and my dog.  I just want to go home and enjoy their company, do a little more writing.  I miss visiting the boxing gyms near my home and I just miss being a civillian I guess.  My wife even told me someone from my local village football team was looking for me to play.  Now there’s something new.  I’ve been talking to them for a few weeks now to see if I can get a game and they finally came calling!  I watched a few games down our local playing fields and it looked a little “blood guts and thunder” which I’m not too sure about. It’s a different vibe to your friendly game of fives.  As a country we talk about wanting to be on a technical par with the rest of the world but you look down at this level and we’re still a nation of warriors when it comes to football and I think to myself – is that something I want to be part of?

[Sigh] I’ll see when I get home.

 

Gone in 60 seconds…

Okay, this is supposed to be a boxing blog so I don’t know why I’m writing about car-jacking a forklift! – Alright it’s like 02:00 – still a lot of light and I walked off the gangway and looked left and then right.  Where the hell has the forklift gone?

So I walk from warehouse to warehouse until…

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There he is! – That’s Pegasus!  Shit look at how much light there still is at 02:00!  Does Norway ever get dark in the summer?

I’ve never driven a forklift before in my life but damn me I’ll not leave this trip without taking him for a gallop around the yard.

So I open the door and climb in…

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YES! Someone’s left the keys in!

So the first thing I notice is the 3 pedals… Wait – aren’t these things meant to be automatic transmission?  So what does that far left pedal do?  Shit!

I run back inside and Google up “How to drive a forklift”.  After a bit of digging I find out that it’s called an “inching pedal” – it works like a clutch in a manual car so you can manouver the forklift gently (when you’re trying to lift something up).  I don’t need to use this pedal though because I’m not going to be lifting anything.  Pegasus and me are going for a joy ride – we’re not working.  This is strictly pleasure, not business.

So I turn the keys in the ignition.  Nothing.  What the hell.  I look around.

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Wooo! Look at all those buttons!

That lever that’s shaped as a “T” – that’s forward and reverse and it was stuck in forward so I flicked that into the middle (hopefully that’s neutral) and tried the ignition again. Pure guesswork…

Pegagus roars into life

YEAH!

I’m pumped by now.  This is awesome.

So then I take him for a spin.  I’m a little cautious at first on the accelerator but he’s a very forgiving beast and then I go a bit faster and unleash the beast.. all 15 km/h (10 mph).  Air con blasting in my face – I’m grinning like a child on Christmas Eve.  Pegasus is very tempremental.  He doesn’t feel very stable though and there’s this constant beeping which I’m trying to ignore but it’s all part of the fun.

A couple of laps around the yard and…

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… we’re parked.  Look at how much light there is!  I can’t get over that!  It’s still only 02:10 in the morning!!!

Gone in 60 seconds?  It was more like 600 seconds.  But Pegasus’ been working all day and I’ve just had an hour’s training session not so long ago so we’re both a little tired.

Thanks Pegasus.

(You would never guess I’m a 37 year old man, would you?  My poor wife!)


Pegasus (Ancient Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is one of the best known creatures in Greek mythology. He is a winged divine stallion also known as a horse usually depicted as pure white in color. He was sired by Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and foaled by the GorgonMedusa.[1]

I’m nearly home

My alarm kicked me up at 22:30 today.  (My shift starts at midnight) – I knew I was going to take a rest from the training but what I didn’t expect was to fall deep asleep again.

Like I blacked out.

Next thing I know Rich (my room mate) is knocking on the door. Luckily he needed to go to the gym so at least I could get my shit together and leave the room nice and tidy.  Just as well we were at the dockyard and not on shift, out at sea.

So yeah check my new room out (I got the top bunk):

bunkbed.jpg

Getting down from there is a nightmare.  That ladder does absolute Jack.  What I really need is a fireman’s pole to slide down.  But then again I sleep completely naked and the thought of where a friction burn may occur is making my eyes water.

Why do I gotta move cabins?

I’ve had to move into another cabin and share because it’s pretty busy just now at the dockyard.  The vessel is maxed out with engineers trying to do their work.  I haven’t slept in a bunk for a while (maybe 3 years).  It gets warmer because there’s not as much circulation – you’re closer to the ceiling. I woke up and I was sweating (despite the temperature turned right down).  I couldn’t be sure though because I had a bad dream about Hiss, the snake from Jungle Book.  Sharing the cabin’s fine though because Rich works days and I work nights.  We’re never in the room at the same time.  Oh yeah and I banged my head at least 3 times during the night.

I’m tired…, erm again

I needed to take a day off from the training completely today and that whole sleeping-in thing just confirmed that.  Either that, or my sleep was so poor that my paltry 5-6 hours just wasn’t cutting it.  Plus I woke up and my elbow joint was just sore.  Plain sore.  Too much punching action.

Want to write more

I was thinking of my short story The Kid and even though it constituted the equivalent of a a few hundred words… that’s the first piece I’ve ever finished writing since I was 15.

And you know what?

…I really enjoyed just reading something complete.  I just hope I can translate that into something bigger.  I’ve wanted to publish something since I was 15 but back then my old man stopped me from pursuing that.  He got it into his head that going science and engineering was a safer bet.  Maybe he was right (because judging from the number of stories I’ve trashed maybe I’m not a natural storyteller) but it’d mean the world for me to be able to get a story out.  Something finished.

That boxing gear we ordered on welfare arrived!

Did I mention that some of the other crew took a bit of interest in my boxing?  So I think some of those guys  wanted to try it at some stage so I was allowed to buy a new heavy bag.  (The one I resurrected was pretty old and by week 2 I’d punched all the sand to the bottom). We also decided to buy some gloves and some focus pads and some other bits and pieces.  Hung the bag up just today – check it out…

newheavybag.jpg

It’s 1.5m tall – that’s 5-feet.  It’s pretty solid.  Had to do some trickery with the chain to get it to hang higher.  It sits pretty nicely now.

Reunited with my Reeboks

reebokrealflex.jpg

I left these on another boat almost 4 years ago.  The crewing manager promised me I’d return but I never did and they actually demobbed her a few weeks ago and I got some personals back.  These are just a pair of Reeboks I bought when I was in Galveston, Texas. First pair of Reeboks ever but they’re such a great running shoe.  They only cost me 45 bucks (compared to some of the crazy 200 dollar jobs you can find) but they’re the only running shoes I ever tried to buy thereafter.  I don’t think Reebok make the Realflex model like this anymore.  There’s something about this design I love so much.  It’s a shame they stopped.  The new one’s aren’t so nice.  I’ll treasure these until the day the grip dies.

Poppy is getting better

I mentioned my dog had a stroke while I was away but she’s getting better.  She’s walking stronger, getting back to her old self.  Stairs are still a bit of a problem for her but she’s improving all the time.  I’ve got 4 more days away from my wife and dog (and the cats) but I miss them so very much.

One more thing I need to mention…

When I started writing this blog I just wanted to keep a diary on my boxing… but I read and follow other people.  I didn’t expect that I’d take an interest like that but some people are keeping diaries on their illnesses, their problems and their worries and I found that I really care about those people.  I want them to get better and get over their hurdles.  I’d love for people like  peaceableme to not feel so forlorn or for boxingandballet to feel better at work.  It makes my problem of trying to make my left cross better seem so trivial and stupid.  I hope they’re all fine.

Here’s a view of Rissa in Norway where we are just now.  This is about as dark as it ever gets this time of year and there was more light than this because the exposure on my camera phone wasn’t so great. (I was stood underneath the helideck)

rissa

Hey tomorrow I’ll tell you the story of how I took this forklift truck for a joyride, how does that sound? – Still sounds crap maybe? Oh well, I’ll try and make a fair stab of making it seem interesting.